Tuesday, June 27, 2017

A Screening of "The Mummy" (2017), "Wonder Woman", and "47 Meters Down"

Confessions of a Film Junkie: A Screening of "The Mummy" (2017), "Wonder Woman", and "47 Meters Down"

A Video Review by Brian Cotnoir

Hello All this week, I'm reviewing not one, not two, but three new movies!  Be sure to watch all three to let me know what you think.  *SPOILER WARNING* for "The Mummy" (2017) and "47 Meters Down".  The "Wonder Woman" review DOES NOT contain any Spoilers at all.



My Review of "The Mummy"


My Review of "Wonder Woman"


My Review of "47 Meters Down"

Sunday, June 25, 2017

Classics: A Review of An American Tail By Lauren Ennis


July 4th commemorates the signing of the Declaration of Independence and the American thirteen colonies uniting to form a new country. While the holiday honors our nation’s historical triumphs, it has since become a celebration of America’s present as much as it’s past. Although the America of today may be drastically different from the land that our founders fought for, it remains a land of freedom and opportunity that continues to draw immigrants from across the globe. The film I’ll be reviewing this week, An American Tail, chronicles the struggles and triumphs of the immigrant experience while highlighting the ways in which immigrants from around the world have shaped the United States’ into the nation that we know today. While the film may have been written for children, this tale of immigrant mice arriving in a new country in search of a better life will resonate with audiences of all ages.

Everywhere around the world they're coming to America
The film begins in 1880’s czarist Russia as the Mousekewitz family celebrate Hanukkah. The celebration is cut short, however, when Cossacks arrive and attack the family’s village in one of the czar’s anti-Semitic pogroms.  While the Cossacks terrorize the villagers, the film parallels the violence with a virtually identical attack against the village’s mice by the Cossack’s cats. While the Mousekewitzes escape unharmed, their home is destroyed and they continue to face oppression under the cats. To avoid further violence and persecution, the family set out for the United States where they are told there are no cats and the streets are paved with cheese. Their arrival in America proves bittersweet, however, after middle child Fievel falls overboard during their journey. Miraculously, Fievel survives by taking shelter in an empty bottle and manages to wash ashore in New York City just as his family enters Ellis Island. The film then chronicles his efforts to make sense of his new home as he struggles to reunite with his family, even as they cope with life in a new country and continue to mourn him.

The film expertly captures the experiences of 19th century immigrants in a way that both informs and entertains young audiences. For example, the film maintains its historical context by relating some of the varied reasons that people left Europe for America through catchy songs and the child-friendly metaphor of mice as immigrants and cats as forces of oppression. The film similarly explores such historical issues as Tammany Hall corruption and child labor, but maintains viewer interest by remaining firmly focused upon how these issues directly impact Fieval and his family. The film’s portrayal of a diverse cast of characters working towards common goals captures the spirit of America’s melting-pot while teaching lessons in tolerance and the importance of teamwork. Perhaps the film’s greatest strength is the way in which it refuses to talk down to its audience and presents the struggles and triumphs of immigrants in America in equal measure, which makes the character’s ultimate successes more satisfying. Thus, An American Tail uses familiar elements of children’s films to relate a historical story that will both entertain and enlighten young audiences.

The mice ain't gonna take it, no they ain't gonna take it

The film brings together breathtaking animation, enjoyable songs, and engaging voice acting to bring its unique version of 1880’s Europe and America to life. The animation is lovely without ever overwhelming the story and creates a striking balance between realism and cartoonishness. One of the visual highlights is the way in which the mouse world is shown as part of the world at large, and the greater world is shown from a mouse’s perspective. The film also utilizes several memorable songs including the tear-inducing Oscar nominated ballad, “Somewhere Out There” and the rousing “There are No Cats in America”. The voice acting is uniformly excellent with actors portraying a wide variety of characters of varying nationalities with nuance, enthusiasm, and charm.

Part historical drama and part musical adventure An American Tail is a film that truly has something to offer the entire family. Through its tapestry of song, action, and animation the film brings the bustling streets of a changing America to life. It’s portrayal of immigration in all its grittiness and glory lends an all too human heart to this tale of mice on the move. For the young and young at heart alike An American Tail is an apt reminder of what it means to be an American.

Happy Independence Day!

Sunday, June 11, 2017

Classics: A Very Disney Father's Day By Lauren Ennis


Last month I put the spotlight on some of the best mothers and mother-figures in Disney’s animated canon. While slightly less joked about than Disney moms, Disney dads are just as subject to mishaps and untimely demises as their female counterparts. From Bambi’s absent father to Jasmine’s well-meaning but utterly unfit to rule father, to countless deceased fathers, the land of Disney can certainly be a dicey place for dad. Just like Disney moms, however, Disney fathers and father-figures are some of the best in cinema. Here’s to three jolly-good fellows who could teach us all a thing about parenting and appreciating our parents.


Mighty big paws to fill
MUFASA: Disney’s answer to Atticus Finch, Mufasa might well be the king of Disney dads as well as king of the Pridelands. Throughout The Lion King, Mufasa leads by example and uses seemingly mundane moments as opportunities to instill his son, Simba, with respect for the world around him. For instance, in one of the film’s most quotable moments, he teaches Simba that every living thing down to the very grass that we walk upon plays its own crucial role in the circle of life. He then goes on to remind his son that their roles as rulers of the Pridelands come with responsibilities as well as privileges. Mufasa also makes a careful effort to curb Simba’s budding sense of entitlement and holds him accountable for his mistakes. He then goes a step further by showing his son that there is a lesson to be learned from every mistake and openly acknowledges his own mistakes. Despite his numerous responsibilities, he also makes time for his family and treats his role as father with equal importance as his role as leader. Mufasa puts his own safety at risk on multiple occasions in order to protect Simba and eventually makes the ultimate sacrifice in an effort to save Simba’s life. Even after his death, it is the memory of Mufasa and all that he instilled in Simba that inspires Simba to stop running away from his problems and claim his proper place both in his family and on the throne. Twenty three years after The Lion King’s release, Mufasa still reigns as one of the best fathers in cinema.

Why fit in when you can stand out?
MAURICE: Beauty and the Beast’s Belle is often remembered as one of Disney’s first truly modern princesses due to her intelligence, independence, and nonconformity. One viewing of this classic and you’ll see that viewers can thank Belle’s inventor father, Maurice, for instilling those qualities in her. While the rest of the village dismisses her as ‘a beauty but a funny girl’, Maurice sees the true value in his daughter’s mind and willful personality and encourages her to develop them. He consistently shows an interest in her life and passions, but also allows her privacy and personal space; a tricky line for any parent to walk, let alone a single dad in the 18th century. When she confronts him with her inability to fit in, rather than blame her for defying local norms he instead insists that she’s perfectly fine just as she is. While he does suggest that she befriend villain Gaston, he quickly dismisses the thought when she explains her dislike for him, whereas most parents of that era would have insisted that a match with Gaston was her best option. It’s obvious watching the two interact that they enjoy a supportive and trusting relationship that many real-life families would envy, quirks and all. Later, after Belle bravely takes Maurice’s place as the Beast’s prisoner, Maurice springs into action and courageously sets out to rescue her alone when the town ignores his pleas. Even in the film’s final act he trust’s Belle’s judgment in spite his own terrifying experience with the Beast, and helps her reach the Beast in time to warn him when Gaston and the local villagers invade the castle. While the locals may dismiss him ‘crazy old Maurice’, it would be crazy not to include Maurice on any list of great Disney dads.

The things that happen when you wish upon a star
GEPPETTO: No list of Disney dads would be complete without the studio’s first animated father, Geppetto. After years of devoting himself to his work, carpenter Geppetto realizes that he has left no time to start a family of his own. After wishing upon a star, however, his patience is rewarded when the benevolent Blue Fairy appears and brings one of his hand-made marionettes to life. One obstacle still remains in the way of the unusual family’s happiness; the puppet, Pinocchio can only become a real boy if he proves himself worthy by leading a good and virtuous life. Over the course of the film Pinocchio gives in to one temptation after another until little hope remains that he’ll ever become real. Through all of his mistakes, however, Pinocchio can always rely upon Geppetto for consistent guidance and unconditional love. Geppetto even puts his own life at risk when he faces the monstrous whale Monstro in order to bring runaway Pinocchio safely home. Geppetto also does his best to instill the willful Pinocchio with a strong moral base by teaching him right from wrong and the value of hard work. While Pinocchio might initially reject his father’s advice, it is the values and lessons that Geppetto teach him that ultimately allow him to become real. While Pinocchio might not have always been a real boy, the love between him and Geppetto is never less than utterly real.