Monday, May 22, 2017

A Screening of "Alien Covenant"

Confessions of A Film Junkie: A Screening of "Alien" Covenant"

A Video by Brian Cotnoir

Hey All, I just saw the New Alien Film "Alien Covenant" click on the video below to hear my thoughts.  This is a SPOILER FREE Video :)



My Review

Sunday, May 14, 2017

Classics: Most Memorable Disney Moms and Mother-Figures By Lauren Ennis


Since the 1937 debut of Snow white the films of Walt Disney have been a staple of childhood around the world. Despite the popularity of the studio’s animated adventures, however, one trend has been a point of contention amongst fans and critics alike; the recurring absence of mothers and mother figures throughout the studio’s catalog. From the death of Bambi’s mother to the numerous portrayals of wicked step-mothers, evidence abounds that the wonderful world of Disney is less than wonderful for Mom. Fortunately, while significant portrayals of mothers in Disney’s animated films may be few and far between, what these mothers lack in quantity they more than make up for in quality. In recognition of Mother’s Day I’ll be shining the spotlight on three of Disney’s most memorable animated mothers. Tell me who your favorite Disney moms are in the comments!

Mrs. Jumbo-Perhaps best known for its critiques of both bullying and animal abuse, Dumbo is also a compelling testament to the power of maternal love. Being a single working mom isn’t easy, and as Mrs. Jumbo shows us, that fact holds true for four as well as two-legged mothers. Throughout Dumbo Mrs. Jumbo tries to shield her son from the harsh realities of circus life, but despite her best efforts, Dumbo remains a favorite target for harassment from both circus staff and audiences. From virtually the moment he is born he is subjected to scrutiny from the other circus animals who mock his unusually large ears and hurtfully nickname him ‘Dumbo’. Emboldened by the shy elephant’s inability to stand up for himself the circus animals continue to berate him as he grows up. The only light in his bleak existence in captivity is his mother who defends him against the other animals’ mockery and provides him with unconditional love and support. She finally reaches her breaking point, however, when a group of children in the audience cruelly mock Dumbo during a performance and lashes out in a justified attack. While the children obviously provoked the attack Mrs. Jumbo is still labeled ‘mad’ and chained in a circus train car that functions as a solitary confinement cell. The separation proves devastating for mother and son, as is best demonstrated in a heart-wrenching scene in which he visits her at her cell only to find that they are still separated by prison bars. The remainder of the film’s plot chronicles his efforts to find the courage to stand up to the adversity surrounding him and reunite with his mother. While the film’s plot veers into the fantastic, its depiction of motherly love remains starkly grounded in reality. From acting as Dumbo’s guardian and defender to facing imprisonment for his sake Mrs. Jumbo proves herself to have a heart whose size matches her name.

Kala- The jungle is a decidedly less than ideal place to raise a family, and interspecies families are unconventional to say the least and yet gorilla Kala manages to make her unorthodox family a truly loving one in 1999’s Tarzan. Grieving from the loss of her own son, Kala discovers the orphaned Tarzan after his parents are killed in a brutal leopard attack and is touched by the child’s plight. When the leopard returns to finish the slaughter it started she springs into action and risks her own life to save him. Upon bringing him to the safety of her gorilla troop she decides to adopt the child as her own against the urging of the other gorilla’s especially her mate, Kerchak who refuses to acknowledge, let alone bond with Tarzan. While the other gorillas’ bullying, Kerchak’s disapproval, and his own appearance prove constant reminders of how different he is from his adopted family, Kala treats Tarzan with the same love and respect that she would her biological child. With her guidance and support he grows up with the firm belief that who he is matters more than how he appears to others. It is the respect for himself and others that she instills in him that later allows him to form a bond with Jane despite their many differences. When resented with the choice between suitor Clayton and Tarzan it is the respect, kindness, and generosity that Kala taught Tarzan that ultimately wins Jane over. Even after he is offered the opportunity to return to England with Jane and take his place amongst human society Kala continues to put Tarzan’s needs first and lead by example when she encourages him to make his own decision whatever the outcome may be. In one of the film’s most heartfelt moments he assures her that “no matter where I go or what I do you will always be my mother” reminding us all that it is love and not blood that defines a family.

Nani-With its modern setting, sci-fi subplot, and rocking Elvis Presley score Lilo and Stitch is one of Disney’s most unique efforts. The story’s primary focus is upon the fish-out of water story of an alien experiment struggling to fit in on earth as he tries to remain one step ahead of the galactic police trailing him. While Stitch’s adventures provide a fascinating story arc and plenty of laughs, it is the relationship between the two human sisters who adopt him that provides the film with its emotional core. After the death of their parents Nani is thrown into the role of surrogate mother and father to her willful younger sister, Lilo. Although barely out of school herself, Nani aptly assumes the role of family breadwinner and parent while coping with her own grief. Even as Lilo continues to drive Nani crazy in the way that only a sister can, Nani continuously makes Lilo her priority as she works grueling hours and puts her social life on hold in an effort to create a stable home and keep social services at bay. Through each step their by turns bizarre and difficult journey Nani and Lilo continue to face the future together, personifying the true meaning of ‘ohana’, the Hawaiian word for family which Lilo explains means ‘nobody gets left behind or forgotten’.

Saturday, May 6, 2017

Classics: A Review of The Promise By Lauren Ennis


In the wake of tragedy we are consistently reminded of the importance of remembering and learning from traumatic events. Yet, all too often, the greatest tragedies and atrocities in history are ignored or forgotten as time passes. Such is the case of one of the most horrifying events of the twentieth century; the Armenian Genocide. The genocide lasted from 1915 to 1917 and ultimately claimed the lives of 1.5 million Armenians and other Christian minorities within the Ottoman Empire, who were systematically rounded up, imprisoned and executed by the Ottoman government. While this tragedy later provided the blueprint for Hitler’s Final Solution, the genocide has received remarkably little attention from popular media. Although a select few films chronicling the genocide have been released in Europe, Hollywood is only now releasing its first production focusing upon the Armenian Genocide; The Promise. The film relates the events of 1915 to 1917 through the eyes of a group of friends living in Constantinople (now Istanbul) at the eve of World War I. Over the course of the film, each of the central characters is drawn into the events of the genocide with devastating consequences. Despite its difficult subject matter, The Promise is at its heart a testament to the resilience of both individuals and a nation, even in the face of the most unspeakable adversity.

The stuff that inspiring tales are made of
The story begins in the Armenian village of Cirun as aspiring physician Mikael (Oscar Isaac) reluctantly agrees to an arranged marriage at the urging of his parents. Using the dowry money from his engagement, he travels to Constantinople in hopes of earning his medical degree. He is dazzled by the Ottoman capital and the modern life he enjoys there, even as political tensions between Armenians and Turks continue to rise. Conflict enters the tale when he meets and is instantly smitten with his cousins’ beautiful governess, Ana (Charlotte Le Bon), who is already involved with talented and passionate, but alcoholic, American reporter, Chris (Christian Bale). Just as the romantic triangle reaches its boiling point, however, World War I breaks out with the genocide following less than a year later. Over the course of the film, each of the characters is faced with impossible decisions and unspeakable horror at every turn as they struggle to survive in a world that is crashing down all around them. In spite of its innumerable tragedies, however, the plot contains triumphs of the human spirit as the central characters fight for justice and freedom without compromising their integrity or humanity.

While it is shocking that Hollywood is only now approaching this subject over one hundred years after the Armenian Genocide, The Promise, is a more than successful first effort. Praised by historians for its accuracy, the film chronicles the progression of the genocide with unflinching honesty. Rather than portraying the characters as possessing unrealistic foresight, which would be more befitting of a modern viewer reflecting on history, the film instead remains within historical context by highlighting the ways in which ordinary people all too often ignore or fail to recognize the warning signs surrounding them. The film also relates how the Ottoman Empire concealed its atrocities under the guise of ‘war-time evacuation’, and the ways in which the outside world chose to ignore blatant red flags surrounding the fictitious evacuation. While some critics have criticized the film’s focus upon its fictional characters, I found that by relating the events from the characters’ perspectives the film infused its story with poignancy and humanized the historical events it portrayed. Regardless of whether or not Mikael, Ana, or Chris actually existed, their inclusion in the plot reminds viewers of the real people whose relationships, country, and lives were upended and destroyed. This personalized approach allows audiences to gain insight into the individual tragedies and triumphs experienced by the Armenian people and enables the story to resonate on a personal as well as political or historical level. Thus, the film captures the emotion and sweep of the greatest historical epics while still remaining true to history.

Some of the best reporting this side of Woodward and Bernstein
The stellar cast bring the events of the Armenian Genocide to life with a depth, intelligence, and emotion that ensures that the historical events will resonate with modern audiences. Oscar Isaac infuses Mikael with an idealism, earnestness, and resilience that calls to mind Omar Sharif’s performance in the classic epic Doctor Zhivago. Christian Bale brings a depth and nuance to his role as the courageous, but flawed, Chris that captures both his character’s heroic passion and inner demons. Charlotte Le Bron’s Ana is an alluring combination of elegant charm, warmth, and steely grit, making her a truly endearing heroine. The supporting cast lend apt support with Marwan Kenzari and Shohreh Aghdashloo earning particular note in their roles as Mikael’s conflicted Turkish friend, Emre, and Mikael’s overbearing but well-intentioned mother, Marta.

Following in the tradition of such acclaimed historical dramas as Hotel Rwanda and Schindler’s List, The Promise highlights what is one of modern history’s most devastating and forgotten events. The film portrays the events of the genocide in a way that highlights the horror of the atrocities committed by the Ottoman Empire, while still paying homage to the resilience and courage of the Armenian people and those who aided them. Through its well written script and superb performances the film relates its tragic tale with an accuracy and humanity that earn it a place amongst Hollywood’s best epics. In a world in which atrocities and human rights violations are still committed each day, this film serves as both a call to remembrance and a dire warning for the present.

I'm not gonna cry...sniff..I'm not gonna cry...